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Politico: Nelson Not Likely to Prevail in Florida Senate Race Recount

It looks Sen. Bill Nelson is just too far behind Gov. Rick Scott for Democrats to cheat their way into the seat. But maybe that’s not giving them enough credit.

According to Politico:

Nelson has two major problems, experts say: Nelson’s lawsuits were filed so late and courts generally frown on last-minute post-election changes, and the margin he trails Scott by is so big that even expanding the pool of available ballots to count makes it highly unlikely that Nelson could make up enough ground.

“A royal flush is right on the money. Nelson would have to have a perfect hand,” said Michael Morley, a Florida State University election law professor, echoing two other experts who spoke to POLITICO.

“He would have to win in every case. And even then, it would not seem to be enough to change the outcome,” Morley said. “One study that I’ve seen shows that in the 21st Century, there have only been three statewide races that have had their results changed as a result of a recount. And in each of those races, the margins were in the hundreds, not more than 12,000.”

As of the most recent update, only 7,871 absentee ballots were rejected statewide due to “voter error,” which could include mismatched signatures on the ballots compared with what’s on file with the state. And of them, 35 percent were cast by Republicans, 36 percent by Democrats and 29 percent by independents. Another 10,186 ballots were rejected because their envelopes were unsigned. Of them, 31 percent were cast by Republicans, 44 percent by Democrats and 24 percent by independents.

So if all those ballots were counted, Nelson would have to win 85 percent of them statewide in an election where he couldn’t get 50 percent of the vote so far.

12 Responses to Politico: Nelson Not Likely to Prevail in Florida Senate Race Recount

  1. I hope you are right. I have lost track of the makeup of the 2019 Senate. Is it still 51 Republicans to 49 Democratic. Arizona elected the Democrat so there is one lost Republican seat. Would that make it 50-50? The Republicans are still on shaky ground. They can not depend on Murkowski from Alaska or Collins from Maine.

  2. Whatever the end result of all the voting turmoil in Florida, the good people there have a electoral mess to clean up.
    Arizona doesn’t fare much better in voting matters either.

  3. Article 1, Section 5, Clause 1 of the U.S. Constitution:

    “Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a Minority Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and under such Penalties as each House may provide. ”

    In other words, the House and the Senate can refuse to seat candidates who won an election.

    When the Democrats controlled the Senate, they refused to seat a Republican who won a Senate seat in 1974.

    Maybe with these elections in FL and AZ that smell like rotten fish left out in the sun for a week, the Republican leadership will refuse to seat these two electoral thieves.

    Yeah, right. That would require some stones and we all know McConnell and Ryan don’t have a pebble between them.

  4. It appears to me that what is going on in Florida is that the Democrats actively trying to cheat and steal an election. It also appears to me that there is nothing that can be done about it. I really don’t get how this can happen in this day and age.

    The MSM not making this fraud a focus of the daily news adds fuel to the fire that they are the enemy of (half) the people

  5. What the hell has happened to our Republic?

    Florida leftists say “Butt out !!, our business is our business because it only affects us.” … WRONG! … It also affects the rest of of the nation at the congressional level.

    Election ineptness and/or conscious criminal intent has made Florida the laughing stock of the nation.
    .