As of now, I am in control here, in the White House

How Trump’s Rudeness Combats Political Correctness

From an article I have running today on the NBC News website:

Kelly Sadler, a White House communications aide, made a crack recently during an internal meeting about how Sen. John McCain’s opposition to President Donald Trump’s CIA pick, Gina Haspel, didn’t matter because McCain is “dying anyway.”

Once the remark was leaked, presumably by someone who doesn’t much like Sadler, the media — mainstream and social — exploded as if the stock market had crashed.

What a horrifying thing to say! Proof of the rottenness at the core of the Trump White House! Off with her head — that is, let’s get her fired and ruin her career!

Of course, it was not at all a nice thing to say. And yes, Trump says many, many not nice things. And it could be that his rudeness and crudeness trickles down to the staff.

But Trump’s directness has been a big part of his appeal, even to evangelicals and other “deplorables” accused of hypocrisy and obtuseness for backing a profane man. They were tired of being told what they are allowed to say and think. And nobody is going to tell Trump what to say.

There’s something refreshing about that. Even important. Because it gores a useful wound into the stultifying and dangerous political correctness that is increasingly gripping the nation.

You can read the rest of the piece here. I hope you enjoy it!

8 Responses to How Trump’s Rudeness Combats Political Correctness

  1. (I pulled the icon to #5, but it didn’t help)
    What some call profane or rude talk is what we call honesty. Is HillaryClinton “crooked” – sure.
    The 2016 election wasn’t just changing political agendas, it was a constitutional revolution against what seemed like an overwhelming rush to socialism and worse.

    re: JohnMcCain
    He should resign his position immediately. His wish to die while a sitting US Senator is selfish and against the wishes of the people of Arizona.

  2. I read the entire article and agree with it. I too think President Trump is over the line on occasion, but I also believe that he does speak the truth, as did Mr. Kelley when he spoke about immigrants. His comments weren’t hurtful, they were candid and honest. Most people are kind and compassionate. I put myself in that box, but I also understand reality. I treat people the way I want to be treated – doesn’t mean I agree with everything they do or say. I have friends who certainly don’t share my view of many things. We simply don’t discuss those things.

  3. Reminds me of the quote: “Would you rather be lied to politely or told the truth rudely”.

    I’m still chuckling from an article (Bloomberg?) the other day saying Obama is missed because he has integrity. O’LOLOLOLOLOL !

  4. Trump is what we used to call “plain spoken”. He talks like we talk. Says what we say. Yes, he uses salty language, as we do. So what? We know other Presidents used much worst language, I.e., Lyndon Johnson. Other Presidents lied to us every time they spoke, Barry Obama, e.g. Trump is a breath of fresh air.

  5. Thank you, Mr. Koffler, for having the courage to speak openly in public. May God bless you and keep you.

    Respectfully regarding your comment about Mr. Buckley’s piece, my reading is he was arguing not at all for anything so hateful as what the term “white supremacy” attempts to describe.

    I believe he was arguing for the rightness, for all, of conserving the culture of Western Civilization, for civility in general, and so for the necessary assimilation, over time, of “outsiders” into the American culture, which was created and is maintained by those led by the Holy Spirit, the followers of Christ.

    He is arguing against majority or “mob” rule, which as you may recall, is what killed Socrates.

    I understand you may be simply be attempting to position yourself as someone who does not worship dead white men.

    However, in the absence of Mr. Buckley’s ability to speak for himself, I humbly submit a defense.