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Rubio Tries to Claim Gang of Eight Bill Wasn’t Intended as Law

It was just “the best we could do” and was intended to be changed in the House. That’s a new one.

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31 Responses to Rubio Tries to Claim Gang of Eight Bill Wasn’t Intended as Law

  1. Jeff Sessions was on Mark Levin’s show tonight. In discussing Rubio’s participation on the Gang of Eight, Session noted that Rubio’s recollection and explanation of what actually went on with that group, was not the same as his (Session’s). Very polite way of saying, Rubio’s lying.

  2. O Rubio, Rubio…Wherefore art Thou, Rubio? A liar? A flip-flopper? A Miami hustler? An opportunist? A robot? A boy who would be King? Or are you just too dumb to realize you are not ready for prime time? Not that you EVER will be ready. Hillary is dying to get her claws into you, Marco. You are definitely not the ‘only one who can beat her’. Wise up!

    • Yes, “gang” doesn’t quite catch what went on with those conspirators (which is what they were).

      Here’s some choices:
      Cahoots–they were in cahoots with each other. They were cahooters.

      Confederation–these political crackpots were in confederation with each other. They were confederators working against the will of the American people.

      Mob–Rubio joined a Congressional mob whose purpose was to trick the American people. They were mobsters.

      Sometimes we have to make up a word to get at the truth in a new word. As in, Rubio participated in a polygaggle of conspirators and cahooters designed to fool the American people. ;+}

      • Sending a bill to the other house where it can be amended is called regular order–which has been abandoned in past yrs…Rubio or no. But yes, if I can “explain” something that seems to be misconstrued I will-it has nothing to do with Rubio…and yes, I support him. And Kasich. And I could vote for Bush, too.

  3. I wish he would just admit he supported a losing horse and wouldn’t do it the same way again. I respect a guy who owns up to and learns from his mistakes.

    • I believe there is an argument to support the premise that Rubio is not a “natural born” citizen and therefore, ineligible to be elected President.
      Yes, he was born here, but both his parents were Cuban citizens at the time of his birth. They did not become citizens until he was four years old. The natural born citizen qualifications for the presidency require the candidate and at least one parent to be bone fide citizens of the USA at time of birth.
      Obviously (at least to me) Trump does not regard Rubio as a threat or he would have threatened to sue him and Cruz on the basis of eligibility.
      Personally, I regard Rubio’s candidacy as a trial run for him. I do not believe he thinks he has a chance but he will have made his name nationally known. For me, he is much too much reminiscent of BHO.
      Now Jeb…Jeb still thinks he has a chance.
      His candidacy is kind of pitiful…like Hillary. The poor woman barked like a dog – a yipee-yapee dog at that.

        • Excerpt from “On the Meaning of ‘Natural Born Citizen’ ” harvardlawreview.com:
          No doubt informed by this longstanding tradition, just three years after the drafting of the Constitution, the First Congress established that children born abroad to U.S. citizens were U.S. citizens at birth, and explicitly recognized that such children were “natural born Citizens.” The Naturalization Act of 17908×
          8. Ch. 3, 1 Stat. 103 (repealed 1795).
          provided that “the children of citizens of the United States, that may be born beyond sea, or out of the limits of the United States, shall be considered as natural born citizens: Provided, That the right of citizenship shall not descend to persons whose fathers have never been resident in the United States . . . .”9×
          9. Id. at 104 (emphasis omitted).
          The actions and understandings of the First Congress are particularly persuasive because so many of the Framers of the Constitution were also members of the First Congress. That is particularly true in this instance, as eight of the eleven members of the committee that proposed the natural born eligibility requirement to the Convention served in the First Congress and none objected to a definition of “natural born Citizen” that included persons born abroad to citizen parents.10×