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David Axelrod Discusses His Daughter’s Epilepsy

Thought you might be interested in this Fox News piece on the struggle waged for many years by Obama’s top adviser, his wife and their daughter. An unimaginable trauma and torture.

A reader comments on his own experience with epilepsy. You can read his story, which is quite poignant, here.

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6 Responses to David Axelrod Discusses His Daughter’s Epilepsy

  1. Nothing makes a parent feel more useless, impotent and anxious than having a sick child. It takes a lot of love and faith to keep a family together in times of troubles and the Axelrod’s seem to have an abundance of both.

  2. I watched the story about Lauren Axelrod on “The O’Reilly Factor”. I want to share my story with the Axelrod family about my years of having epilepsy.
    I was diagnosed with epilepsy after having a high fever before the age of one. I really didn’t know what it was that I had except that my parents said that I had “spells.” When I was five, my father, my six year old sister and my two year old brother were involved in a boating accident n the Hudson River where my brother had drowned that day. For a long time, I had felt that I should have been the one to die because I felt that I was a defect and my brother had no medical issues. It wasn’t until I was a teen that I had asked my parents “If you could choose who would have died that day, who would you have chosen?” My mother had asked “Why did you ask that?” and I told her how I felt and she cried.
    I had found that I was an epileptic when I was a young teen when there was an epilepsy commercial on TV and my father said “You have that.”
    I had seizures for almost 50 years. Medication helped slow the frequency of seizures but I would have several seizures a month. I always tried not to let the epilepsy interfere with my life. After graduating from college, I worked in radio as a DJ for several years, I worked at IBM for almost 14 years, 11 of those years producing corporate videos and today, I work in the Operations Control Center at Delta Air Lines. I have been with Delta for over 15 years.
    January 1, 1990, I was admitted to Yale Medical Center to try and get the seizures under control, either by new medication or surgery. The surgeons at Yale found scar tissue on the hippocampus portion on the right temporal lobe and they had felt that this was causing the seizures. They had changed my medication when I was dsicharged and the seizures were under control for a few years.
    Finally, I was admitted to Emory University in September, 2004 where they had tested me and they had agreed with Yale’s findings. I was scheduled for surgery on April 12, 2005 where the scar tissue was going to be removed. The surgeon had removed the scar and 6 months later, I had met again with the surgeons to talk about me driving, now that I was seizure free. January 2007, I was taken off all medication and I have been seizure free since April, 2005. I thank God every day for the Emory staff that had performed that surgery on me.
    Several months after the surgery and being seizure free, my mother wept and she couldn’t thank the Emory surgeons enough, freeing me of 50 years of seizures.
    Today, I volunteer with the Community Emergency Response Team in the community I live in and I am on the Delta Air Lines Care Team where we talk to family members who have lost a loved one at an airline crash scene. I thank God that my services have never been requested and that there has never been a crash since I have joined the Care Team.
    The Axelrod family is in my prayers and please feel free to contact me if there is anything you would like to discuss.

    John Del Santo Jr

    • Thank you John for sharing your moving story. I’m happy to see that after years of struggle you’ve been relieved of this awful burden, and that you have devoted yourself to aiding others in similar need.

  3. hell Im a certified nyc teacher with a seizure disorder.
    I am now substitute teaching part time and have no health care.
    I take a medication called keppra which controls my seizures.
    which cost $ 300 a bottle . I wish health care was available to people
    so they could exist and work and have a right to life